SAIC

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SAIC (Science Applications International Corporation) is a FORTUNE 500 scientific, engineering and technology applications company headquartered in the United States with numerous federal, state, and private sector clients. It works extensively with the United States Department of Defense, the United States Department of Homeland Security, and the United States Intelligence Community, including the National Security Agency, as well as other U.S. Government civil agencies and selected commercial markets. SAIC is also one of the top ten biggest defense contractors for the United States and remains relatively under the radar.

SAIC was founded by Dr. J. Robert “Bob” Beyster in 1969 in La Jolla, California, as Science Applications Incorporated. He was Chairman of the Board until his retirement in July 2004, and also served as Chief Executive Officer (CEO) until November 2003. [[]](Defense Advanced Research Project Agency) designated Dr. Beyster an Honorary Program Manager for his distinguished contributions to the agency over his career.

On November 3, 2003, Kenneth C. Dahlberg was named the CEO of SAIC, ending Beyster’s 30+ years of leadership. In 1967 he started his career with Hughes Aircraft, where he held various engineering, program management and leadership positions and served successively as president of three different corporate divisions. After Raytheon acquired Hughes in 1997, he became president and chief operating officer of Raytheon Systems Company. In 2000, he became executive vice president for business development and president of Raytheon International.

In fiscal year 2003, SAIC did over $2.6 billion in business with the United States Department of Defense, making it the ninth largest defense contractor in the United States. Other large contracts include their contract for information technology for the 2004 Olympics in Greece and from 2001 to 2005, SAIC was the primary contractor for the FBI’s unsuccessful Virtual Case File project. SAIC relocated its corporate headquarters to their existing facilities in Tysons Corner in unincorporated Fairfax County, Virginia, near McLean, in September 2009.

In 2002, SAIC was chosen by the NSA to produce a technology demonstration platform for the agency’s Trailblazer Project in a contract worth $280 million. Trailblazer is a “Digital Network Intelligence” system, intended to analyze data carried on computer networks. Project participants included Boeing, Computer Sciences Corporation, and Booz Allen Hamilton. SAIC had also participated in the concept definition phase of Trailblazer, beginning March 2001. According to science news site PhysOrg.com, Trailblazer was a continuation of the earlier ThinThread program. In 2005 NSA director Michael Haydn told a Senate hearing that the Trailblazer program was several hundred million dollars over budget and years behind schedule.

Trailblazer is a NSA programme intended to analyze data carried on computer networks. It can be used to track communication methods such as cell phones and e-mail. According to science news site PhysOrg.com, Trailblazer was a continuation of the earlier ThinThread program. In 2002 a consortium led by Science Applications International Corporation was chosen by the NSA to produce a technology demonstration platform for the agency’s Trailblazer program in a contract worth $280 million. Project participants included Boeing, Computer Sciences Corporation, and Booz Allen Hamilton. The project was overseen by NSA Deputy Director William B. Black, Jr., a former SAIC employee.

SAIC had also participated in the concept definition phase of Trailblazer, beginning March 2001.In 2005 NSA director Michael Hayden told a Senate hearing that the Trailblazer program was several hundred million dollars over budget and years behind schedule.

A series of articles on the problems with Trailblazer was written by Baltimore Sun reporter Siobahn Gorman in 2006-2007. She received an award for this work from the Society of Professional Journalists.

Several anonymous NSA sources told Hosenball of Newsweek that the project was a “wasteful failure”

Employees


You've impressed us all with that postnig!

Notes

--I suck and I can't figure out how to open a new topic on this page, but I really want to add this timeline of SAIC's internet entanglement. It's important to look at the RFCs, also, which I'll try to do later. Anyway:


ICANN landmarks This page provides a basic chronology of ICANN, the UDRP and ACPA. Context is provided by the more general multi-part timeline about communications history. This site also features a detailed chronology for auDA as part of the profile on that organisation and the dot-au space.

1967

Engelbart establishes ARPAnet NIC (Network Information Center) at Stanford Research Institute

1971

Karp suggests "host mnemonics", precursor of DNS

1981

Miller describes Domain Name System (DNS)

1984

domain name system (DNS) introduced .au TLD delegated to Melbourne University's Robert Elz by US National Science Foundation (NSF)

1985

first dot-coms registered UK is first registered ccTLD

1990

Elz delegates some responsibility to Geoff Huston of Sydney University

1992

US National Science Foundation (NSF) appoints NSI to manage .com, .net, and .org domain names

1994

US government privatises internet management

1995

NSF allows NSI to charge for domain registrations Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) acquires NSI for a reported $3m

1996

Elz delegates responsibility for .com.au 2LD to commercial unit of Melbourne University, subsequently floated as Melbourne IT Nominet established in UK

1997

International Ad Hoc Committee (IAHC) releases Generic Top Level Domain Memorandum of Understanding (gTLD-MoU) Australian Domain Name Administration (ADNA) established as a nongovernment body but does not proceed

1998

US Government commissions A Proposal to Improve Technical Management of Names and Addresses Green Paper from Ira Magaziner criticisms of Green Paper reflected in White Paper on Management of Internet Names & Addresses that calls for creation of nonprofit corporation (ICANN) to handle consensus-based technical management of the net's infrastructure US asks World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) to conduct consultative study on domain name/trademark issues dot-AU Working Group established under Commonwealth auspices but gets bogged down Australian National Office for the Information Economy agrees to facilitate creation of Australian internet self-regulatory regime, with transfer of authority from Robert Elz to new entity Internet Corporation for Assigned Names & Numbers (ICANN) established

1999

WIPO report recommends uniform dispute resolution policy (UDRP) for all registrars in the .com, .net and .org TLDs ICANN Board accepts the DNSO recommendation for UDRP WIPO and NAF approved as first dispute-resolution service providers under UDRP first UDRP proceeding (worldwrestlingfederation.com) commenced US enacts Anticybersquatting Consumer Protection Act (ACPA) auDA established to manage dot-au TLD first auDA Board election

2000

SAIC sells NSI to VeriSign for reported US$15.3 to US$20bn 'dot-com crash' ICANN creates new gTLDs (eg dot-info and dot-biz) eResolution approved as third UDRP arbitrator CPR approved as fourth UDRP service provider first UDRP proceeding (worldwrestlingfederation.com) decided WIPO seeks comments on trademark and domain name issues WIPO releases 'Best Practice' guidelines Geist's paper on ICANN's Uniform Dispute Resolution Processes Civil Society Internet Forum (CSIF) launched ICANNmembers.org launched ICANN At-Large elections

2001

auDA consultation exercise about competition, dispute resolution and names policy auDA gains formal delegation for dot-au TLD eResolution withdraws from UDRP NGO & Academic ICANN Study report WIPO issues interim report on UDRP

2002

updated version of Geist's Fair.com paper study of UDRP by Max Planck Institute Asian Domain Name Dispute Resolution Centre replaces eResolution ICANNAtLarge.org launched US Commerce Department renews Memorandum of Understanding with ICANN WIPO becomes sole dispute-resolution service provider for dot-edu through the EduDRP LACNIC established as regional net registry for Latin America and Caribbean announcement that European Commission will manage ICANN Government Advisory Committee (GAC)

2003

NomCom appointments to ICANN Board VeriSign SiteFinder controversy VeriSign sells 85% of dot-com and dot-net registrar operations to Pivotal Private Equity for US$100m World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) held in Geneva

2004

OECD report on gTLD process Security & Stability Advisory Committee report on DNS security OSG buys dot-coop domain name registry and registrar operation from Poptel UN establishes Working Group on Internet Governance Frank Fowlie appointed as first ICANN Ombudsman

2005

ICANN accepts .jobs and .travel TLDs, moves towards .xxx TLD US government indicates intention to retain control of the Root

2006

ICANN renews contract with US Department of Commerce

There are a lot of spaces to fill in, but the SAIC/NIS (Network Solutions)/ICANN/DNS "bloc" is a vital key in the charm bracelet of the private/"public" security apparatus. Ghosts everywhere. If not starting, then continuing with Jon Postel. PLEASE, revise, extend, denounce, reformat, edit, delete. Just look the fuck into it. This is not over. Got that from: http://www.caslon.com.au/icannprofile10.htm

Let 100 Wikis bloom!

Free BB. Peace out